Testosterone Replacement Therapy Can Correct And Prevent Anemia Testosterone Replacement Therapy Can Correct And Prevent Anemia

Testosterone Replacement Therapy Can Correct And Prevent Anemia

A recent study has found that Testosterone Replacement Therapy (TRT) can effectively prevent or correct anaemia in men with hypogonadism.

Hypogonadism is a condition where the body doesn't produce enough testosterone, and it's often overlooked as a potential cause of anaemia in older men. Anaemia is a condition characterised by a low level of haemoglobin in the blood. Approximately 15% of older men with hypogonadism experience anaemia.

In a randomised clinical trial called TRAVERSE Anemia, which involved 815 men with anaemia and hypogonadism, researchers discovered that men who received 1.62% testosterone gel experienced significant improvements in their haemoglobin levels compared to those who received a placebo gel. Here are the key findings at different time points:

  • Over six months, 41.0% of the TRT group had their haemoglobin rise to 12.7 g/dL or higher, compared to 27.5% in the placebo group.

  • Over 12 months, the respective percentages were 45.0% for the TRT group and 33.9% for the placebo group.

  • Over 24 months, it was 42.8% for TRT and 30.9% for placebo.

  • Over 36 months, 43.5% for TRT and 33.2% for placebo.

  • Over 48 months, 44.6% for TRT and 39.2% for placebo.

Furthermore, the proportion of men who experienced an increase in haemoglobin by more than 1.0 g/dL was significantly higher in the TRT group at all time points. For example, 32.7% of the TRT group had at least a 1.0 g/dL increase after six months, compared to only 16.5% in the placebo group. This suggests that TRT can be an effective treatment for anaemia in men with hypogonadism.

In a study involving 4,379 men without anaemia at the beginning, researchers found that those who received testosterone gel were less likely to develop anaemia than those who received a placebo. Here are the key findings at different time points:

  • At six months, 7.2% of the testosterone gel group developed anaemia, while 10.4% in the placebo group did.

  • At 12 months, 7.1% of the testosterone gel group developed anaemia, while 9.0% in the placebo group did.

  • At 24 months, 10.0% of the testosterone gel group developed anaemia, while 12.3% in the placebo group did.

  • At 36 months, 10.0% of the testosterone gel group developed anaemia, while 12.9% in the placebo group did.

  • At 48 months, 9.0% of the testosterone gel group developed anaemia, while 10.2% in the placebo group did.

Additionally, there was a significant increase in haemoglobin levels with testosterone replacement therapy (TRT) at all time points by an average of 0.3 g/dL.

At six months, men taking TRT were twice as likely to correct their anaemia as those taking a placebo, and the risk of developing new-onset anaemia was 31% lower in the TRT group. According to responses to the Hypogonadism Impact of Symptoms Questionnaire (HIS-Q), the increase in haemoglobin was associated with a slight improvement in energy levels.

In terms of adverse events, nonfatal cardiac arrhythmias and acute kidney injury occurred more frequently in testosterone-treated patients, especially in men with anaemia. Six men stopped TRT due to high hematocrit levels.

The study's findings highlight the effectiveness of testosterone in correcting anaemia and preventing its development in middle-aged and older men with hypogonadism. The mechanisms for these effects include testosterone's stimulation of erythropoietin production, increased iron availability, enhanced myeloid progenitors and maturation, and improved red cell survival.

This anaemia trial was part of the more extensive TRAVERSE study, which included men aged 45 to 80 years with low testosterone levels and hypogonadal symptoms, along with an increased risk of cardiovascular disease (CVD) or a CVD diagnosis. The prevalence of anaemia in the study was 15.7%, and the specific causes of anaemia were undetermined.

In summary, it seems reasonable to offer TRT to men with symptomatic hypogonadism, regardless of their haemoglobin levels. However, regular monitoring of haemoglobin levels and normal prostate-specific antigen levels before starting treatment is recommended.

If you need help, consider consulting with Mobi Doctor for medical guidance and assistance.

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